Timeline

This timeline establishes a workflow for you and for me. The timeline is subject to change, however, as our work evolves and the class develops. Success in this class begins with you managing your time, committing regular effort several days a week to reading, thinking, and writing, and proactively seeking assistance when you need it.

Week 1

Tuesday January 16 Introduction to the course. Books and timeline. Writing and Domains. Overview of Domain of One’s Own project: kscopen.org

We will also be reading together with the web-annotation tool Hypoethes.is

Sign up for an account by following the Hypothes.is Five Step Instructions. 

Access The Essay Hypothes.is GroupWhen you have created an account, this link allows you to join the group “The Essay.”

Thursday January 18 Discussion of Siddartha Mukherjee’s recent essay, My Father’s Body, at Rest and in Motion. After sharing some thoughts on Mukherjee’s essay using Hypothes.is, we will dedicate the remainder of the class session to building your course blogs

Class follow-up reminders:

  • Read I have updated the course web site. The This Week page outlines your work for next week. Enjoy the reading!
  • Send me your URL I need the web address for the course site, so www.yourdomain.kscopen.org/nameofyourcourseblog
  • Build your course blog. Read Setting Up Shop: Your Domain on the course web site. Then read and work on your site using the post Create | Manage | License. The create section is meta commentary, the manage page will guide you through your work on the WP dashboard, and the license section will get you set up with a Creative Commons License. I also recommend the WordPress tutorials on the Blog of our Research and Technology Fellow Emily Whitman or go to the well-organized and comprehensive WordPress Codex. I am also ready and willing and able to  help with any and all kscopen.org or WP questions. Just toss me an e-mail
  • E-mail me to make an appointment during my office hours during week 2 or week 3 for a brief conversation about the course, questions you may have, and your aspirations for the semester

Week 2

Our reading this week will be centered around the question of the essay as a literary form, the history of the essay, and of essaying as a cultural activity. On Tuesday we will begin with the writing of the sixteenth-century French writer, Michel Eyquem De Montaigne, whose prose is often cited as among the first instances of the essay, and then look at commentaries on the essay in the early nineteenth century by William Hazlitt, Charles Lamb, and Ralph Waldo Emerson. On Thursday we will talk though selected definitions of the essay. As you read, be thinking about the essay you will be writing this week on the nature, form, and purpose of the essay.

During week two you will also be building your course web site on kscopen.org. Your goal for the end of the week is to have an attractive and functional space to begin sharing your writing. Your site will have a brief personal biography or statement, and pages to organize draft materials, as well as other features. On Thursday we will look at a few examples of your sites, and talk about the basic protocols for posting your first essay.

Tuesday January 23 Discussion of the Essays of Michel de Montaigne, available on the Project Gutenberg site. Make some notes on his prose style. Discussion of selected definitions of the essay to 1925: Montaigne, from “Of Practice, “Of Repentance,” and “Of Vanity” (1580), 1-6; Ralph Waldo Emerson, from “Montaigne, or the Skeptic,” 23-24; William Hazlitt, from “On the Periodical Essayists” (1815), 13-18; Charles Lamb, from an unpublished review of Hazlitt’s Table Talk (1824), 19-22; Ralph Waldo Emerson, Quotation and Originality; William Gass, “Emerson and the Essay” (1982), 106-09

Discussion Partners: Luke (Bartlett), Chelsea, Luke (Thors)

Thursday January 25 Discussion of more recent definitions of the essay: Jean Starobinski, from “Can One Define the Essay?” (1983), 110-15; Philip Lopate, “What Happened to the Personal Essay?” (1989), 127-36; Robert Atwan, “Notes Towards the Definition of an Essay” (2012), 194-201; Carl H. Claus, “Toward a Collective Poetics of the Essay” (2012), xv-xxvii

Discussion Partners:Courtney and Meghan

Due Sunday January 28: Essay 1 An essay on the nature, purpose, and form of the essay. We will talk about the possibilities for this essay during class. This essay will be 1500 words, or six double-spaced pages. At the end of the essay, write a 500 word descriptive commentary of your method: What exactly you are trying to convey? What specifically are you trying to do as an essayist in this essay? Using examples from your essay, how have you chosen to go about doing it? 

Week 3

The work for this week is rethinking, refining, and developing the first essay. You have work to do. We will be talking about essaying as a practice of constructing and contributing ideas. We will also be collaborating to create a semester of writing in which you do less responding to and rehearsing of other people’s expectations for your writing.

Editorial Partners for Essay 1: Julia, Kate, Courtney, Joey, Ben, Sam, Patrick

Tuesday January 30 Domain Work (bring your machine!)

Thursday February 1 Writing Workshop

The editorial team will guide our in-class work and their notes will appear on the Workshops page by Thursday morning. Also read the post The Etiquette of Freedom in Coursework. You should also continue thinking about and working on your first essay. What idea does your essay take up? What is the intellectual, ethical, and civic contribution of your essay?

Sunday February 4: complete revisions of essay 1. Begin reading / thinking about essay 2

Week 4

Sunday February 4: complete revisions of essay 1. Begin reading / thinking about what you would like to do for essay 2. We will talk about the second essay on Tuesday during class. I am interested in the emerging collaboration around an idea: a semester of writing in which you do less responding to and rehearsing of other people’s expectations for your writing and more defining for yourself essays that are motivated by what you are trying to do as a writer of an essay. If you think about your essay less in terms of a prompt from me, that is, how would you set to work on a piece of writing (and essay) that makes an intellectual, ethical, and/or civic contribution of some kind?

Tuesday February 6 Discussion of the poetics of the essay: William Dean Howells, from “Editor’s Easy Chair” (1902), 36-37; Jose Ortega Y Gasset, from “To the Reader” (1914), 38-39; William Carlos Williams, “An Essay on Virginia” (1925), 48-50; Katherine Fullerton Gerould, from “An Essay on Essays” (1935), 61-4; German Arciniegas, “The Essay in Our America” (1956), 78-81; Hilaire Belloc, “An Essay upon Essays upon Essays” (1955), 51-54. Also read (and annotate using Hypthes.is if you are so moved) Ross Gay, Some Thoughts on Mercy(The essay is published in the online journal The Sun. The category “Essays, Memoirs, and True Stories” has a number of interesting essays for students and writers of the form)

Discussion Partners: Nick, Savannah, Devon

Thursday February 8 Discussion of the poetics of the essay: Mariano Picon-Salas, from “On the Essay” (1954), 71-77; Theodor Adorno, from “The Essay as Form” (1958), 82-87; Aldous Huxley, from The Preface to Collected Essays (1960), 88-90; Michael Hamburger, “An Essay on the Essay” (1965), 91-93; Gerald Early, from the Introduction to Tuxedo Junction (1989), 137-41; Nancy Mairs, Essaying the Feminine” (1994), 142-46; Rachel Blau Duplessis, from f-Words: An Essay on the Essay” (1996), 147-50; Cynthia Ozick, “She: Portrait of the Essay as a Warm Body” (2000), 151-58; Sara Levine, from “The Self on the Shelf” (2000), 159-66

Discussion Partners:  Patrick

Due Sunday February 11: Essay 2 Know what you are doing and do it well. Your essay will be 1500 words, or six double-spaced pages. At the end of the essay, write a 500 word descriptive commentary of your method: What exactly you are trying to convey? What specifically are you trying to do as an essayist in this essay? Using examples from your essay, how have you chosen to go about doing it? 

(The original prompt was an essay on definitions and that prompt follows. What happened in essay 1 is that many of you are sorting through the definitions and so I think we should rethink the prompt for essay 2.

In class on Tuesday we agreed to leave to writing prompt as a task for each of you. The focus will be less on what I want you to do and more on what you want to do in your essay. In class today we followed up on the “idea-centered” essay and the many forms it can take on that sliding scale between formal and informal, genteel or vernacular, conventional or open—call it what you will. Let’s consider Hilaire Belloc’s comment that “stuff is infinite” and the essayist who “finds in the unending multiplicity of the world unending matter for discussion and contemplation”; and also let’s consider Ortega Y Gasset’s modi res considerandi, or as he translates the Latin, “possible new ways of looking at things,” and his description of ideas taken up by the essayist so that that the essay becomes “a pretext and an appeal for a wide ideological collaboration.”

Some of you may want to still consider an essay on definitions of the essay, thinking with the ideas of the writers we are reading, sharing with your reader what you are coming to know. If this is the case, I recommend looking beyond the essayists on essays in our anthology. The Mason Library, for example, has a number of resources on the essay, including introductions by a guest editor to selected volumes in the annual Best American Essays series edited by Robert Atwan. Phillip Lopate also has an anthology, The Art of the Personal Essay: An Anthology from the Classical Era to the Present that has a helpful introduction of the personal essay.)

Week 5

The essay I mentioned last week in class, if you are interested, is Sam Anderson, What Cross-Country Skiing Reveals about the Human Condition

Editorial Partners for Essay 2: Chelsea, Patrick, Nick, Savannah, Devon, Fletcher, Dylan

Tuesday February 13 Writing Workshop: figuring out if you have something to say

Thursday February 15 Discussion of selected commentaries on the essay:  Jia Tolentino, The Personal Essay Boom is Over; Michael Depp, On Essays: Literature’s Most Misunderstood Form; and Laura Bennett, The First-Person Industrial Complex. Also, listen to Talk of the Nation, Writers’ Views: The Art of the Essay, a discussion led by Neal Conan with Hilary Masters, Robert Atwan, and Meaghan Daum, and bring your notes on the conversation to class.

Discussion Partners: Joey, Ben, Sam

Week 6

Sunday February 18: complete revisions of essay 2. Reading and thinking about essay 3 should be well underway

Sunday February 18: Second version of essay due

Registration for the 2018 summer term begins on Monday

Tuesday February 20

Begin conversations of Crafting Presence: The American Essay and the Future of Writing Studies. I recommend that you purchase the book to mark up. However, the full text is available in the Dspace archive at the University of Colorado, a repository service that collects, preserves, and provides access to digitized library collections and other scholarly and creative works from several academic entities in Colorado. As you read, consider how the book “seeks to establish common ground among literature, creative writing, and composition’s approaches to essay analysis so that teachers and students can articulate more precisely and consistently their understandings and expectations for essays” 15-16. Our discussion will focus on the “Introduction” (3-19) and chapter two, “The Genre of Presence” (20-59). We will also bring to our conversation The Essay is the Genre of Presence: An Interview with Nicole B. Wallack

Discussion Partners: Julia, Anna, Kate

Thursday February 22 Discussion in Crafting Presence: The American Essay and the Future of Writing Studies“Creating a Self Made of Images in Essays” (167-96) and “Learning the Essay” (197-212)

Discussion Partners: Fletcher and Dylan

Due Sunday February 25: Essay 3 This essay will be a profile of the style of a writer whose essays you believe are worth knowing. This essay will be 3000 words, or twelve double-spaced pages. You have two weeks: one week for reading. Another week for writing. (Of course you will be reading and a writer during the first week and writing as a reader during the second week.)

Choose an author–James Baldwin, Susan Sontag, John McPhee, Adrienne Rich, Wendell Berry, David Foster Wallace, Annie Dillard, Mary Oliver, see the list below for more suggestions. Get a book of essays, or find the essays in the Open Library, as soon as you can, by your author. Read. Remember that as you read you should be reading and a writer, learning from the essays how a writer does her work.

Then write. Consider this essay a documentary of (of or pertaining to facts) or a commentary on a body of work by a writer. Your essay will inform, drawing on the essays as well as any secondary materials (the essayist writing about essaying, or commentary). Your essay might explore the essays as kind of essay-personal, conversational, or opinion; philosophical; critical; humorous; pastoral; autobiographical; scientific; documentary; or political. Wallack’s chapter on “historical thinking” in essays and her chapter on “Errors and illumination” provide examples of this kind of writing (although her aperture is open wider, looking across books of essays by different writers). Another way to go at this essay is to discover a way of writing that exemplifies a poetics of the essay using one of the categories in Ned Stuckey-French’s “Thematic Guide to Entries in the Bibliography,” 217-22:

The Essay as embodiment of mind in the process of thought; as embodiment of personality or projection of the self; as a mode of discovery; as an open, unmethodical genre; as pointed and purposeful genre; as a pleasurable rather than polemical genre; as skeptical, antidogmatic; as an attempt, trial, or experiment; as conversational or familiar in style; as an allusive, intertextual genre

The Essayist as candid, genuine, truthful; the essayist as made up, impersonation, persona; the essayist as having a distinctive style or voice, the essay as a gendered form

The Essay in Context: the essay as different from methodical discourse, academic theme, article; the death (or revival) of the essay; the essay as modern; the essay as middle-class or intended for a middle-class audience; the essay as genteel, old fashioned, organic, quaint; the essay and the new media; the essay as ephemeral or less important

The Best American Essays Series offers a marvelous offering in the art of the essay. Atwan’s essay in Publisher’ss Weekly The Top Ten Essays Since 1950 makes an informed case for the post-war essays and essayists you might want to know. And Atwan and Joyce Carol Oates, who edited The Best American Essays of the Centuryprovide you with a list of authors to exploreMark Twain • W.E.B. Du Bois • Henry Adams • John Muir • William James • Randolph Bourne • John Jay Chapman • Jane Addams • T. S. Eliot • Ernest Hemingway • H. L. Mencken • Zora Neale Hurston • Edmund Wilson • Gertrude Stein • F. Scott Fitzgerald • James Thurber • Richard Wright • James Agee • Robert Frost • E. B. White • S. J. Perelman • Langston Hughes • Katherine Anne Porter • Mary McCarthy • Rachel Carson • James Baldwin • Loren Eiseley • Eudora Welty • Donald Hall • Martin Luther King, Jr. • Tom Wolfe • Susan Sontag • Vladimir Nabokov • N. Scott Momaday • Elizabeth Hardwick • Michael Herr • Maya Angelou • Lewis Thomas • John McPhee • William H. Gass • Maxine Hong Kingston • Alice Walker • Adrienne Rich • Joan Didion • Richard Rodriguez • Gretel Ehrlich • Annie Dillard • Cynthia Ozick • William Manchester • Edward Hoagland • Stephen Jay Gould • Gerald Early • John Updike • Joyce Carol Oates • Saul Bellow

At the end of the essay, write a 500 word descriptive commentary of your method: What exactly you are trying to convey? What specifically are you trying to do as an essayist in this essay? Using examples from your essay, how have you chosen to go about doing it? 

Week 7

Editorial Assistants for Essay 3: Luke (Bartlett), Luke (Thors), Meghan, Anna

Tuesday February 27 Writing Workshop. Sign up for individual conferences

Thursday March 1 Writing Workshop. Overview of Self Assessment process

Due Sunday Self Assessment, Essay Sequence Prospectus, Second Version of Essay 3

  • Save a copy of the English 402 Self Assessment to your desktop. Complete the Self Assessment and send to Mark
  • Send Mark an e-mail with a one- or two-page prospectus for the series of essays (3-5 pieces) you plan to write during the second half of the semester. See The Essay Collection page for a description of the project
  • complete work on third essay
  • continue work on essays 1 and 2

Week 8

Monday March 5 Individual Conferences
Tuesday March 6 Individual Conferences (no class)

Thursday March 8 no class. Please take advantage of the time this week to think about, and perhaps begin writing notes for, your series of essays

Week 9

Tuesday March 13    No class: Spring Break
Thursday March 15   No class: Spring Break

Week 10

Weeks 10-12 are writing weeks (you will be working on your essay sequence) and also weeks for building your domain on kscopen.org.

“In both life and literature it is necessary to have some means of bridging the gulf between the hostess and her unknown guest on the one hand, the writer and his unknown reader on the other.”

-Virginia Woolf, “Mr. Bennet and Mrs. Brown”

Weeks 10-12 are writing weeks (you will be working on your essay sequence)

Tuesday March 20 While we will not be in the classroom you will use the dedicated class time to complete the following by 2PM:

  • Post your Prospectus on your blog. Give the post a title that reflects the idea(s) you are working with in your essay sequence. You can upload the version that you sent to me before our conference or post a revised version.
  • Read the prospectuses. Find 5-6 that interest you and make a comment on the blog posts. Your comments should be designed to help the writer move ahead with the essays.

Using our class time you should have no problem posting the prospectus and your comments by the deadline.

Thursday March 22 Questions and discussion of essays sequence. Read David Foster Wallace, Shipping Out: On the (nearly lethal) comforts of a luxury cruise (Harper’s Magazine 1996). Please be prepared to take part in a conversation about what this essay is doing.

Sunday: post a complete draft of an essay in your sequence and post to your blog

Week 11

If you have not posted your prospectus, post your prospectus. Also, please comment on other prospectuses if you have not done so

Sunday: post a complete draft of an essay in your sequence and post to your blog

Any time this week: send Mark representative or exemplary essays (such as the one we read and discussed by David Foster Wallace) that we will use for conversations about essay writing strategies.

Tuesday March 27 Practice as poetics: workshop using examples of essays from your essay sequences

Food Insecurity Survey At the beginning of class we will be taking a short survey that will help gather information t support the new on-campus food pantry, The Hungry Owl. Students Ian Lehner and Samantha Blanc are conducting the survey to gain insight into student perceptions and experiences regarding food insecurity in order to quantify the need for the pantry

For next time: Read David Madden’s short essay On Laughing: notes on the funniest sound there is and William Carlos Williams’ longer essay Against the Weather: A Portrait of the Artist

I welcome your thoughts on the texts using hypothes.is before class

Thursday March 29 Practice as poetics: workshop using examples of essays from your essay sequences

English Major Survey The English Department is reviewing our curriculum this year, and we want to know your thoughts about what is working well for you and what could be improved.  This survey will only take a few minutes to complete. Your answers to this survey are important to us.  They will help us to improve our program for you and for future students

Sunday: post a complete draft of a second essay in your sequence and post to your blog. Write a commentary on what you are doing in your essay–or trying to do. (This can be at the end of the essay or on a separate page.)

Week 12

The approach to structure in factual writing is like returning from a grocery store with materials you intend to cook for dinner. -John McPhee

Structure of 1973 essay “Travels in Georgia”

Last week we were taking about structure. It reminded me of an essay by John McPhee on structure in nonfiction writing. His piece Structure is useful for any writer. The essay first appeared in January of 2013 in the New Yorker and is included in his book Draft No. 4: On the Writing Process. Intrigued? Have a look at Tim Bascom’s thinking about structur ein Picturing the Perfect Essay: A Visual Guide

By Monday you should have two essays posted on your blog. Our in-class collaboratories are predicated on your writing. Please also make sure that you have read the most recent entry in Teacher Talk, Houses and Chairs

Tuesday April 3 Collaboratory: portfolio workshop and critique.

During the week, read and comment on the essays of a 3-5 of your classmates. Focus attention on 1) what the author is doing (is it self-evident? Is there more than one thing going on? Is the conceptual work of the essay accessible to you as a reader? and 2) what the writer is doing well: be specific, offer constructive commentary on the strategies the author is using, options or suggestions for developing the piece of writing, beginnings and middles and ends, the use of scenes or anecdotes, sections and segmenting, sequencing, and so on

For next time: Read David Gessner Learning to Surf

Thursday April 5 Collaboratory: portfolio workshop and critique

Sunday: post a complete draft of your third essay in your sequence and post to your blog. Write a commentary on what you are doing in your essay–or trying to do. (This can be at the end of the essay or on a separate page.)

For next time: Read The Rules of the Asian Body in America by Matthew Salesses, an essay that appeared in Unruly Bodiesa pop-up magazine created by Roxane Gay and Medium that explores our ever-changing relationship with our bodies — the emotional, the psychological, the cultural, and the scientific. Unruly Bodies has a fabulous set of essays to read

Week 13

Schedule a meeting with Mark, when you are ready, to talk about your essay sequence, during week 13, 14, 15, or 16. Let’s talk when you have a sequence of essays. Before you meet with Mark, post on your blog a reflection (put it on a reflection page, if you have one, or a process or journal page) that takes up a series of questions that will be useful for you to think through and helpful for me to read as we work together in the next few weeks. What have learned about the essay this semester? What have you learned about writing? What have you learned about yourself as a writer? How might what you have learned in the course stay with you or be useful beyond this class?

Tuesday April 10 Collaboratory: portfolio workshop and critique. We will also look at The Rules of the Asian Body in America by Matthew Salesses, an essay that appeared in Unruly Bodies, a pop-up magazine created by Roxane Gay and Medium that explores our ever-changing relationship with our bodies — the emotional, the psychological, the cultural, and the scientific. Unruly Bodies has a fabulous set of essays to read

During the week, read and comment on the essays of a few of your classmates. Focus attention on 1) what the author is doing (is it self-evident? Is there more than one thing going on? Is the conceptual work of the essay accessible to you as a reader? and 2) what the writer is doing well: be specific, offer constructive commentary on the strategies the author is using, options or suggestions for developing the piece of writing, beginnings and middles and ends, the use of scenes or anecdotes, sections and segmenting, sequencing, and so on

Thursday April 12 Collabratory: Portfolio workshop and critique

Sunday April 15 Due: Essay Sequence. Write a commentary on the essay sequence. (This can be at the end of the essay or on a separate page.) Are you satisfied with what you have written? What specifically do you plan to work on over the next two weeks?

Week 14

For this week, before Tuesday’s class, let’s read and discuss three essays written by college students that were recognized by the publisher WW Norton and Company: the 2012 Norton Writer’s Prize Winner, Daniel Penny, Seven Layers of Compressed Plywood; the 2013 Norton Writer’s Prize Runner Up, Alex Ryan Bauer, A History of Men’s Fashions, and the 2016 Norton Writer’s Prize Winner David Ahern, Ourselves. In addition, I have written a post in Teacher Talk that explains the prize and that includes invitation for your to consider submitting an essay to be considered for nomination

Tuesday April 17 Collaboratory: essay sequence workshop and critique

During the week, read and comment on the essays of a few of your classmates. Focus attention on 1) what the author is doing (is it self-evident? Is there more than one thing going on? Is the conceptual work of the essay accessible to you as a reader? and 2) what the writer is doing well: be specific, offer constructive commentary on the strategies the author is using, options or suggestions for developing the piece of writing, beginnings and middles and ends, the use of scenes or anecdotes, sections and segmenting, sequencing, and so on

Thursday April 19 Collaboratory: essay sequence workshop and critique. The class will conclude with a readings on Tuesday April 24, Thursday April 26, and Tuesday May 1. We will finalize the reading participants (6 each day) in class

Nota bene (note well): Before you meet with Mark, post on your blog a reflection (put it on a reflection page, if you have one, or a process or journal page) that takes up questions that will be useful for you to think through and helpful for me to read as we work together in the next few weeks:

What have learned about the essay this semester?
What have you learned about writing?
What have you learned about yourself as a writer?
How might what you have learned in the course stay with you or be useful beyond this class?

These questions have led to illuminating discoveries.

Sunday April 22 Choose an essay that you plan to read aloud in class during the final three class meetings. Send Mark the title of the essay so that he can write up the program for the in-class readings

Go back over the self evaluations and use them as checklists for completing the required minimum work in the course. Reread your essays and make any changes that arise in rereading what you have published on your blog. Give a final round of thinking to the organization of your blog, the effectiveness of the theme you are using. If you have not already, complete work on your domain

Week 15

Featured Essay Readings Week 15 (and our meeting during final’s week) will be both writing time for you as well as for us to celebrate our work with the essay this semester by sharing some writing. Each student will have fifteen minutes to read a featured essay from the essay sequence. Please note that the featured essay titles, the name of the student author, and the titles of the course blogs below are all links that can be followed to the digital sites

Tuesday April 24, 2018

Gaining Perspective: An Introduction 

An essay by Chelsea Birchmore from her sequence Gaining Perspective on the course blog The Essay: Poetics and Practice

Living Underwater

An essay by Dylan Ryan from his sequence Living Underwater on the course blog Here Be Essays

Thinking on Thoughts

An essay by Fletcher Rice from his essay sequence on the course blog Shoegazer

Memory vs. Truth

An essay by Ben McDonald from his essay sequence Memory on the course blog What Runs Through My Mind

Joan Didion: A Lonely and Resistant Re-arranger of Things

An essay by Lucas Thors from the essay sequence Poetics and Prose of Essay Pioneers on the course blog Uncovering the Essay

The Perks and Pitfalls of Teaching with Technology

An essay by Kate Reed from the essay sequence Musings of a Student Teacher on the course blog Musings of a Student Teacher

Thursday April 26

Stuck in Your Head: Storytelling Through Music

An essay by Courtney Janvrin from the essay sequence Storytelling on the course blog Write it Down: thoughts from a crowded brain

Realizations

An essay by Meghan Hayman from the essay sequence Underlying Thoughts on the course blog The Essay: Caffeine Driven Writing

Clueless Tourists

An essay by Matt Battey from the essay sequence Life Lessons on the course blog Matt’s Essays

Why We Can’t Simply Disenfranchise

An essay by Joey Lendaro from the sequence The Bystander Role on the course blog Darts in the Dark

Heaven is a Walmart Parking Lot on a 100 Degree Day

An essay by Patrick Taillon from the essay sequence Crusin’ on the course blog Wicked Interesting Stuff Over Here

Angela Davis

An essay by Devon Sacca from the essay sequence The Aphrodite Projecton the course blog The Aphrodite Project

Week 16

Monday April 30 Reading Day: Mark is available by appointment between 9-3

Featured Essay Readings continue this week as we celebrate our work with the essay this semester by sharing some writing. Each student will have fifteen minutes to read a featured essay from the essay sequence. Please note that the featured essay titles, the name of the student author, and the titles of the course blogs below are all links that can be followed to the digital sites

Please note well that our class on May 1 meets from 1-3

Tuesday May 1

Round Pond Harbor

An essay by Luke Bartlett from the sequence Hidden in Green on the course blog From the Downeast

Meet the Gaymer

An essay by Sam Whitaker from the sequence Puzzle of Me on the course blog The Wacky World of Whitaker 

A Letter I Will Never Write

An essay by Savannah Hobbs in the sequence Letters to the Editor from the course blog Hobbs_The Essay

Walking on Subconscious Door

An essay by Nick Chase from the essay sequence The Breaking Point on the course blog Surveying the Essay

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Check the Final Checklist, Deadlines, and Reminders