English 490 American Poetry and Poetics Self Assessment

Fall 2018

Your work American Poetry and Poetics has been dedicated to the following general areas: 1) building a digital domain/blog, 2) writing, editing, and preparing for publication five descriptive commentaries, 3) a class project on twentieth century American poetry, 4) the memorization of three poems, and 5) a final project.

The following self assessment is designed to engage you with a reflective process of reviewing your work and determining what you have learned so that you may more consciously draw on your learning as you move from this course. The assessment will at the same time allow us to review together the projects you have completed this semester, including the editorial project and your individual contributions as a contributing editor to the book American Poetry and Poetics: A Reader’s Guide.

For each of the areas below I am asking you to write a paragraph (no more than a page each) that provides a concise explanation of and evidence for the work you have completed. I am also asking you to assign a letter grade for each of the five areas that you believe you deserve based on the evidence you provide here. While I have detailed notes on your dedication to the projects, the quality of your work, and your contributions to the collective work of the course, in most cases the grade you assign will be the grade you receive in the course.

Finally, the self assessment will conclude with you composing five learning outcomes for the course. Your list of learning outcomes will describe as precisely as you can what you have learned in the course—whether a skill, knowledge, ability, or attitude.

Please submit by email a completed version of the self assessment no later than Monday morning at 8 AM. I suggest that you cut and paste this self assessment in a document and save to your desktop.

 

Name _____________________

 

Building Your Domain and Blog

Did you install Word Press (WP) on your course site? Have you learned how to customize and personalize your theme / blog?  Have you experimented with the design of your blog and maximized features available to you?

Did you choose a theme that works well for you and for a reader and that is visually appealing to you? Does your site have a title and tagline?

Did you create an “about” or an “about me” page and compose a bio statement? Have you added an image (of yourself or a place or an artifact/object of some kind)?

Have you created a list of links or a blogroll? Consider context, perhaps adding the College home page (Title of the link should be the name of the College). Link to course page? Awesome sites for students of poetry and poetics?

Are you using hyperlinks—digital citations that you choose? Is your writing on the web taking advantage of the distributed network to curate relevant materials and inform your readers?

Are you using images or other media in your writing? Your own photographs or illustrations: Are you crediting yourself? If you are using other images, are you attributing these images to their author/origin?

Have you chosen a Creative Commons license and considered how the licenses for your work are designed to address legal, human, and software considerations.

Have you reached out to Mark for technology assistance if you needed it?

Provide Explanation and Evidence Write explanations, not just ‘yes’ or ‘no,’ in response to the elements above. Let the document expand as long as you need it to, but no more than a page. Based on the explanation and evidence, assign a letter grade (A, AB, B, BC, C, CD, D, F)

Poems and Commentary

Did you complete the five commentaries?

Does each commentary include a) the poem, b) an audio file of you reading the poem aloud; c) a succinct overview of the poem (or section or segment of a long poem) and a focused commentary of no more than 500 words, and d) a bibliography and further reading section that directs readers to the extant commentary on the poem

Have you addressed all of the comments on format for and content of each entry?

Did you read Mark’s “commentaries on commentaries” and learn from the examples and apply what you have learned to our own writing?

Have you provided the reader with a reliable overview of the critical reception of poem (how other have read the poem)?

Have you uploaded the files (the commentary and the sound file) to the appropriate Google Drive folder?

Did you complete all of the editorial team work for which you had responsibility?

Provide Explanation and Evidence Write explanations, not just ‘yes’ or ‘no,’ in response to the elements above. Let the document expand as long as you need it to, but no more than a page. Based on the explanation and evidence, assign a letter grade (A, AB, B, BC, C, CD, D, F)

Twentieth Century American Poetry and Poetics

Have you used your blog to you bring to light the conversation about poems and poetry?

What materials are you working with, whether interesting and/or surprising documents or artifacts, that will help us appreciate and understand the poems and poetics you are studying?

Have you created an exhibit (might include poems and commentary by readers of the poems, manuscript pages that are available and in the public domain, images and poems, sound or video) or have you chosen another method to bring the conversation into the open for further discussion?

Is what you have completed thoughtful, creative, engaging?

Did you prepare sufficiently for the class session in which we will be discussing the poems and prose you have been exploring? For example, did you send Mark assigning readings to complete before the class session, asking for digital annotations on the texts, reading and thinking about the materials on your blog, spending time in the library reading relevant materials, reading poems aloud, creating digital texts to use in the class sessions, etc.?

Provide Explanation and Evidence Write explanations, not just ‘yes’ or ‘no,’ in response to the elements above. Let the document expand as long as you need it to, but no more than a page. Based on the explanation and evidence, assign a letter grade (A, AB, B, BC, C, CD, D, F)

The Memory Project

Have you selected three poems to memorize?

Have you memorized the three poems?

On the day of your choice, have you recited the poem to the class?

Have you developed strategies for learning the language of poems by heart?

Provide Explanation and Evidence Write explanations, not just ‘yes’ or ‘no,’ in response to the elements above. Let the document expand as long as you need it to, but no more than a page. Based on the explanation and evidence, assign a letter grade (A, AB, B, BC, C, CD, D, F)

The Final Project

Have you developed a final project? In the project description, I describe what I would like you to consider incorporating in your project proposal, though as I have emphasized these are not all required but rather are offered to help you shape a meaningful project that will engage you and the reader:

  • Practicing frequent short writing, both to explore and express, as well as to prepare for discussion and/or extend in class work;
  • Designing an individualized process that builds from shorter to more developed writing with feedback from peers and professor;
  • Imagining authentic writing and purposeful collaboration as opposed to routine assignments;
  • Learning from the diverse interests and strengths of individuals in the class through writing and intellectual collaboration;
  • Striving toward an ambitious writing project of some kind that includes historical, cultural, and professional contexts and discourse;
  • Producing writing that is intellectually rigorous and rhetorically sensitive to readers and teachers;
  • Working with and adapting formal conventions as tools for exploration and expression

Provide Explanation and Evidence Write explanations, not just ‘yes’ or ‘no,’ in response to the elements above. Let the document expand as long as you need it to, but no more than a page. Based on the explanation and evidence, assign a letter grade (A, AB, B, BC, C, CD, D, F)

Your Cumulative Grade for the Course

Before assigning the cumulative grade, consider the grading philosophy and practice I outline on the syllabus. Note well the focus on 1) your reading, 2) your collaboration with others, and yourself, and 3) your production of a body of writing:

Reading will include thinking with texts in preparation for in-class conversations and engaged reading as a writer. As the class unfolds, your reading will increasingly help you break new ground-to imagine ways of writing beyond cultural and discursive commonplaces; and to unsettle distinctions between the personal and the academic, between lived experience and and the thinking of others

Collaboration is a dance with the insights and ideas of others, in the literary and cultural materials at hand. It is thinking with our teachers, one another, as well as with ourselves. And it is enriched when we recognize that our lived experience is an intersection-of influences in the present and in the past, from the present and from the past. How do you make these things happen? Collaboration happens when you show up in class and participate; when you read, listen, and speak up; when you are making connections across class meetings and to other classes and experiences beyond school; and when you engage with your teacher—in conversation, during scheduled conferences, or in weekly office hours

Writing Everything that you write in this class—from your journal entries to your completed essays—will demonstrate your commitment to developing more complex thinking and to presenting your thinking in engaging and professional ways

Your final grade will use the College grading scale of A, AB, B, BC, C, DC, D, F. This scale can be explained generally in the following way: a C is acceptable work, a B is skillful and articulate work, and an A is creative, unique, in-depth work

 

Final Grade __________

 

List of Learning Outcomes

 

Write no fewer than five outcomes below